4.6.19

South Florida Injury Cases Are On the Rise


Consideration was given for the editing and publication of this post.

Steadily increasing are the statistics behind the deadly crashes on South Florida’s motorways, driving the numbers up by hundreds each year.  In Florida alone, there were 402,385 crashes total, with an astounding 3,116 fatalities in 2017, compared to 2014’s 201,040 tallies of total crashes and 2,494 fatalities.  Injury cases from reckless drivers, uninsured motorists, drivers under the influence, motorcyclists, and hit and run accidents plague South Florida, making the need for competent legal representation all the more necessary.

It is difficult to untangle the various causes behind the spike in South Florida’s startling rise of injury cases, whether the injuries were sustained due to distracted drivers, the influence of drugs and alcohol, or the constant flock of tourists and part-time residents unfamiliar with the roads.  Injury cases that occur off the road could be imparted to negligence of private property, when a person slips and falls due to an owner’s failure to upkeep and adhere to safety regulations, or the common issue of boating accidents that occur frequently on South Florida’s waters.

These numbers are a clear reflection of one of Florida’s recently earned headlines of second-worst state for distracted driving.  Sun Sentinel published an article not long ago in 2017 that reported 50,000 crashes that involved distracted driving in Florida in 2016—more than five crashes every hour.  Of these distracted driving crashes in the Sunshine State, there were more than 3,500 serious injuries and 233 deaths.  The steadily growing number of personal injury cases in South Florida can have distracted driving to blame.  Meanwhile, people like Florida’s residents and police are asking for legislation to make texting while driving a primary offense.

Florida has the unfortunate title beneath its belt of most boating accidents than any other state, and South Florida tends to draw the most attention for this.  Cruise ships also frequent South Florida’s ports and bays, contributing to the number of personal injury cases in the realm of boating accidents per year.  With shores soaked in sunshine and water irresistible to tourists and locals alike, South Florida’s waters make for a recipe for a personal injury case waiting to happen, but with the rise of these personal injury cases are experienced lawyers equipped with the knowledge to navigate these difficult maritime laws. 

Personal injury cases in South Florida can occur due to unintentional slips and falls just as well.  In 2012, 2,475 Florida residents were fatally injured in a fall and there were an additional 62,541 hospitalizations for other injuries due to slip and fall accidents.  Slip and fall accidents can occur on private property, and in many of these cases, the owner should be held responsible for negligence of upkeep and safety.  Other cases behind these increasing number of slip and fall accidents that lead to personal injuries occur at the person’s place of work, contributing to the growing number of workers’ compensation claims.

Even when it seems as if the statics reflect dangerous roads, know that there are skilled attorneys to walk you through every step of a personal injury case should anything happen.  Similarly, your attorneys at Aronberg, Aronberg, & Green are fortified with the knowledge and abilities to take on personal injury cases that involve boating or cruise ship accidents, uninsured motorists, drunk drivers, and cases off the road, like slip and falls or injuries sustained at the workplace.  If you should fall victim to a personal injury accident, an attorney can aid you in seeking fair compensation for your case.  South Florida injury cases may be on the rise, but our trusted legal representation negates the fear of these growing statistics.

25.11.06

Day 40 (week 8): Showdown

The Boss was in a storm today. The Senior Clerk had been to see him. Seems the Senior Partner of the firm of solicitors who were doing the accident on a ship had been in touch. Was very concerned that the Boss’ advice hadn’t been received. Wanted to know every detail as to when it was sent out. The Senior Clerk was equally concerned although he couldn’t put his finger on it as there was no way of knowing that the records had been doctored. He was therefore left having to question the Boss straight out as to what had happened. The Boss was brazen in his lies it seems. Judgment, though, is reserved and this has left him more than a little tetchy to be around.

24.11.06

Day 39 (week 8): Raised eyebrows

Got an email from Worrier this morning. Apparently she has an appointment with the Head of Chambers for Monday morning. Should set the cat among the pigeons.

In the meantime, the Boss is definitely now flirting with BusyBody. Even OldRuin raised his eyebrows at me when the Boss made some comment to her today about what he’d heard about the work she was doing.

23.11.06

Day 38 (week 8): Sex discrimination?

Worrier came to visit today. Asked if I was free for lunch. Naturally, the Boss obliged and off we went to Chancery Lane. She wanted my advice. It seems that a particular member of Chambers has been picking on her. It started with him asking her to do a piece of work. When she returned it, he was highly critical and then asked for it to be done again. On returning the papers for a second time, he was even more critical. The conversation went along the following lines:
“When solicitors ask for your advice, they’re not asking for ifs and buts. They want an answer. Do you understand that?”
“Yes.”
“Have you always had problems being indecisive? Is it just in your nature?”
“No. Well, maybe.”
“How are you going to cope with court? You can’t afford to dither, you know.”
“I know.”
“Maybe it’s just a girl thing and I’m not quite getting it. Is that it perhaps?”
“Er, I don’t know.”

Anyway, she thinks she’s been discriminated against sexually and wanted to know what I thought.

Now, it seemed to me that he could certainly have phrased his comments more diplomatically but if you met Worrier, you’d know that he had a point although it certainly isn’t a girl thing. However, here was an opportunity I wasn’t going to pass up to damage a fellow pupil, potentially fatally. So, I told her I was quite shocked to hear that such things went on at all. Further, she should definitely not let it lie. To do so could in fact be counter-productive as the bullying may only get worse and if it did and she had failed to respond early on, her whole account might come into question.

It was clear that this was not what Worrier wanted to hear. In fact, all she wanted was a little reassurance. However, she’d come to the wrong person for that and by the time I was finished she was ready to complain to the Bar Council. I suggested that perhaps she might instead start with the Head of Chambers to show that she was not unduly escalating matters.

She thanked me so very much for all my help.

My pleasure indeed.

22.11.06

Day 37 (week 8): Tedium

Spent a whole day drafting a schedule of damages for the Boss. I have discount rates and multipliers coming out of my ears and I can honestly say that it has utterly bored me stupid. The worst thing is that the more successful you get it seems in personal injury, the more schedules you get to do. Seems a bit topsy turvey to me. Can’t imagine why anyone would strive to do more of these things.

21.11.06

Day 36 (week 8): Chambers’ tea

Since I have not yet described Chambers’ tea, let me now do so. It happens every afternoon at 4.30pm on the dot. Despite the fact that we are now all on email, each member of Chambers is called by the Clerks and told that tea is being served. Probably about fifteen people turn up each afternoon and it is always quite an occasion.

As a pupil, the lesson I learned very early on was not to speak unless spoken to and even then to keep it as brief as possible. You’ve basically got a room full of egos sitting around on their own personal highs, usually after a day in court. Lets them wind down before getting back to their families. Lots of victories to report and anecdotes to regale and if anyone at all interrupts them, never mind a pupil, then woe betide. This means that after a day of jousting they are all overly polite towards each other. Lots of “No, after you”s floating around add to a very peculiar mix.

Today, BusyBody learned the same lesson the hard way. She accidentally interrupted the Head of Chambers whilst he was lamenting times past. He obviously gave her the floor, ready for an immediate put down. All she was wanting to do was to mention the case she had been on that morning and how interesting she had found it.

After an awkward silence from everyone at the end of her little whimpering monologue, the Head of Chambers then said:“And that is why, Pupils should always be seen and not heard.”

18.11.06

Day 35 (week 7): Client conference

Had a conference with a client today. Contrary to the usual practice of clients coming to Chambers, the Boss and I trekked off to his home in Stratford as he is in a wheelchair. In fact, he’s pretty much unable to do most things and it was very sad. For once, I was proud of the Boss. I think even he was humbled by the client’s dignity in the face of extreme suffering.

The client had fallen from about twenty feet on a building site and his employers were being sued for failing to provide safety rails. It should be a pretty clear cut case but the insurers are inevitably saying it was partly his fault. Common sense and all that. It’s an expensive case. The client was 40 years old at the time of the accident earning some £25,000 a year. Not only is he losing earnings to age 65 but he will also need full time care for the rest of his life. Apparently there are technical arguments which we will be facing on this part of the claim. Anyway, suffice it to say that potentially it’s a multi-million pound claim.

This is a legal expenses case which means that the Boss will get paid win or lose. Hopefully this might bolster the Boss’ resolve. On the journey back, he did lament the fact that we could not work for a percentage of the damages as they do in the States.

17.11.06

Day 34 (week 7): Merry-go-round

Started learning about the personal injury industry today from the Boss. It seems that the food chain starts with the accident management companies chasing the client for the case. The solicitors then chase the accident management companies to pass it on. The junior barristers then chase the solicitors and then if its big enough the QCs chase the junior barristers.

An extremely expensive merry-go-round with the client in the middle not knowing where to turn.

16.11.06

Day 33 (week 7): Over-slept

Slept in this morning. Woke up in a panic at 9am with a sore head. Had been out until 2am the night before. Big mistake. It would be one and a half hours into Chambers and there was nothing I could do. Did I ring up and say I was ill? Or did I just tell the plain old truth?

Neither of these were going to take me very far and so I decided on a slightly bolder strategy. Phoned up the Boss and said that I was at Uxbridge County Court, taking a gamble that no-one was in the court today. Said I thought I was meant to be meeting [Blog] barrister there having had a note in my pigeon-hole about it on Friday. He said he´d ask the Clerks. Got a return phone call from one of the Clerks about five minutes later. He was clearly in a rush. Luckily Monday morning is pretty hectic and the last thing the wanted to be doing is holding an investigation into why I had ended up in Uxbridge. The clerk therefore simply apologised and suggested that I make my way back into Chambers.

Got in eventually around 1pm. Went off for lunch. Then left Chambers at 5pm. The Boss has been teaching me well.

15.11.06

Day 32 (week 7): Coroner´s Court

Had a Coroner’s hearing today. Very strange jurisdiction. A public investigation into an unusual death but with no real powers to do anything or generally to find anything of any great significance. Seems an expensive waste of time to me. Either way, this was one that not even the Boss could settle. He said beforehand,
“A successful hearing is one in which you say virtually nothing.”

And so he proved. His client was a lorry driver who had killed a motorcyclist. The only advice he gave beforehand was not to answer any questions about the accident in case he incriminated himself. The Coroner, a qualified doctor, asked all the questions and when it came to that part, he looked at the Boss and said,
“Will he be answering any further?”
The Boss shook his head.

That was the extent of his work in the Coroner’s Court. Verdict: accidental death. Back in Chambers by 3pm. Brief fee: £2,000.